Research News

Research News

Engagement Research

One thing we want to look at in our Radix research project in student engagement levels. We hope to gain some insight into questions about what activities, concepts, or types of implementation models engage students. One way that we are going to collect data on this is by making observations about students' behavior and affect while they play Radix. Throughout the pilot phase when we visit classrooms, we will be utilizing the BROMP protocol. This is an observation method in which students are observed at time intervals and two things are recorded. One is their behavior - are they on task, off task, talking with their neighbor about the game, etc. The other is their apparent affect - are they concentrating, confused, bored, frustrated? Since these observations are timestamped, later on during the analysis phase we can match them up with back-end gameplay data which is also timestamped. This way we may get a more clear picture of what types of interactions or quests are most engaging or frustrating, and for whom. Stay tuned after the pilot to hear more about what we find!

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Radix Teacher Survey

If you are a teacher who is finished using Radix in your classroom for this semester, please take this survey! It should take about 20 minutes to complete.
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/radix-teacher

Why are we asking you to take this survey? As part of our work at The Education Arcade, we not only design and develop learning games but also conduct research studies around them. One aspect of The Radix Endeavor that we are studying is the feasibility of implementation in schools. Essentially that means we want get a good picture of what the teacher experience is like of using Radix with a class of students. In order to gather feedback on this experience from as many teachers as possible, we are conducting this survey.

Note: If you are still going to do more with Radix this semester, please wait until you're done and then take the survey. Alternatively, if you plan to use Radix again next semester but are done for this semester, please take the survey now!

Bonus: Teachers who have had their students play Radix and take the survey will be entered in a raffle to win a $50 Amazon gift card.

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How you can still be part of the pilot this spring

We’ve been getting several questions asking whether it is
too late to sign up for the pilot. The resounding answer is that
it’s
definitely NOT too late to join us for the spring play session
.  We’re eager to get as many teachers and
students playing as possible. The more people who play, the more we can learn
about the game! Here are a couple of additional common questions that have come
up lately:

How late in the year does the pilot go?  We’ll be collecting data from the game, the
assessments and doing classroom visits up through the end of June. Can’t start
using the game until late May or June? No problem. We’re still happy to have
you participate

What if I only have time do one quest line? That’s not a problem. We want
teachers to use the game as it fits in their classroom. While we’d love to have
students playing multiple quest lines, if you only have time to do one, you can
still take part.

Do you have any suggestions for how to incorporate the game
into the end of the school year? 
Absolutely. These are based on
ideas we’ve had from teachers about how they plan to try it out beyond standard
classroom and/or homework use.

  •        Half your class gone for state exams? Use Radix
    with the other students

  •        Students need some extra practice in certain
    areas leading up to finals? Use the corresponding quest lines to help give them
    extra practice

  •        Looking for something to do after AP/IB/final
    exams? Use the game as a way to continue to engage students with content

  •        Want to give students exposure to new topics or
    ideas that weren’t covered in this year’s curriculum? Pick out a few quest
    lines and let the game challenge students to learn something new

Enroll in the pilot here: 

http://bit.ly/HV8ymZ

 

We encourage teachers to sign up for the pilot, give the
game a try and let us know all the unique ways that Radix can fit into existing
curriculum. As always, feel free to contact
radixhelp@mit.edu
with any questions.

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Research

The Pilot Has Begun!

Exciting news: the Radix pilot has officially started! If you don't already know, one of the reasons we are designing and building this game is not only so that teachers and students can play it, but also to learn more about the ways in which it is and is not effective as a learning tool. To do this we are conducting a research study in which we will collect data about how people use Radix - through classroom observations, surveys, assessments, and game data logging for example.

  • If you're a teacher interested in participating in the pilot study, find out more at radixendeavor.org/teachers.
  • If you want to know about the results of our research, stay tuned this summer!
  • And if you want to know more or help us spread the word about Radix, check out today's press release at education.mit.edu/blogs/carole/2014/02/04.
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Updates

Welcome to Radix

We are a small research group at MIT and one of our current projects is designing, building, and studying an educational MMO called The Radix Endeavor. You can read more about the game and about our lab here.

As part of our design and development process, we collaborate with a number of advisors, teachers, and students. Together, we are designing the curriculum, game mechanics, assessment, prototypes, and all the other facets that will fit together to produce a successful educational game. This process can be lots of fun but it’s never easy, and on this blog we’ll be giving you a glimpse of what goes into it and keeping you in the loop on all of our progress. So stay tuned to be a part of all our exciting adventures!

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The Radix Endeavor is an educational MMO game in development at The MIT Education Arcade, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

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